Granada, Nicaragua - August, 2007

Team Type: Pediatric Orthopedics, Prosthetics and Rehabilitation

Campaign Summary: Triaged 205 children, performed 32 surgeries, provided therapy to about 104 children, and fitted 45 braces.

Cascade DAFO
El Cielo Para Los Niņos Del Ecuador
One Child at a Time

Team Members:
Vicki Cadwallader, Operating Room Nurse
Guy Farris, Orthotist
Karen Lomax, Orthopedic Nurse
Todd Nelson, Orthotist
Sherry Purtymun, Occupational Therapist
Suzanne Leitch-Sharp, Operating Room Nurse
Dr. E. David Shaw, Orthopedic Surgeon
Julie Speck, Physical Therapist
Lettie Turner, Registered Nurse
Dr. Jonathan Young, Anesthesiologist
Karissa Young, Translator

Dr. Juan Barrios, a local orthopedic surgeon and Dr. Zorayda Figueroa were thrilled to host us in our first campaign to Nicaragua. Dr. Barrios and Dr. Shaw collaborated on several cases and worked together on many surgeries. For five continuous days our team was screening patients who were seeking medical advice. The waiting area was always lined with parents hoping to improve the lives of their children. In all, we saw 205 children.

This was the first time we had two orthotists - Guy Farris and Todd Nelson. They work at Summit Orthopedic in the Willamette Valley of Oregon. They were kept busy providing braces, collaborating with the therapist on wheelchair modification, and providing post-surgical bracing. They seemed to be everywhere.

One girl we saw was hit by a bus and paralyzed from the waist down when she was two. She came to us unable to walk when she was four. We had only brought ankle braces that would fit her so we made a commitment to work with a local therapist to construct braces that would allow her to walk with the support of a walker. She was able to walk 6-8 feet using the parallel bars on our last day there. Follow up therapy will be provided.

One day while walking around the hospital Sherry Purdymun, COTA, noticed an infant with a weak cry and inquired about the baby's condition. The three week old baby had pneumonia. Sherry recognized that the baby had neurological problems which prevented normal feeding and swallowing. When eating, food and liquid would go into her lungs and cause pneumonia. The parents were invited to bring the baby to the therapy room where she was given a special pillow and trained in safe feeding and positioning techniques. This pillow allowed the baby to eat and move more normally. It is anticipated that the baby can now avoid contracting future cases of pneumonia due to swallowing complications and develop to her fullest potential.

A strong relationship developed between the orthopedic staff of the hospital and our team members. The hospital is committed to bringing in needy children who can benefit from the visit of our orthopedic team.

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